The Occupy Mars Learning Adventure

Training Jr. Astronauts, Scientists & Engineers


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Press Release: K-12 Classrooms at The Edge of Space: NASA’s 747 Jumbo Jet SOFIA Telescope

                     Press Release

Kids Talk Radio Logo

Bob Barboza, Founder/Director

Kids Talk Radio

Occupy Mars Learning Adventure

1857 Josie Ave. Long Beach, CA 90815

(562) 221-1780

Bob.Barboza@Gmail.com

www.KidsTalkRadioLA.com

For Immediate Release: Thursday, August 28, 2015- Space Science New Flash

K-12 Classrooms at The Edge of Space: NASA’s 747 Jumbo Jet Carries SOFIA, the largest flying telescope in the world

Star Trek’s Nichelle Nichols and Traveling Space Museum’s Ivor Dawson will provide students with a unique view of the stars and galaxies. At 7 PM on September 15, 2015, Ms. Nichols, accompanied by Mr. Dawson, will be the first celebrity to board a special NASA 747 Jumbo Jet and travel to “the edge of space” to experience NASA’s Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). The flight plan calls for observing areas of the cosmos where new stars are being born. During the flight, Bob Barboza and his Kids Talk Radio Space Science reporters will help to connect teachers and students from around the world with Nichols, Dawson and SOFIA via teleconferencing.

The flight will take off from NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center near Palmdale, California. Dawson, who is Nichelle Nichols’ space advisor, will be communicating with several student groups across America that will be hosting star parties with astronomy-themed videos, stories and explanations by celebrity scientists.   As such, he will be the first Los Angeles-based space educator to fly a SOFIA flight. NASA will also coordinate inflight social media interaction with Ms. Nichols via Facebook and Twitter Messages.

From Barboza’s platform in Long Beach, California, students and teachers will create audio podcasts for use in classrooms, based upon Common Core (CCSS) and Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). “We want to do what we can to get kids excited about studying science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) as well as related arts and languages (STEAM ++),” he says.   His Occupy Mars Website will host STEM news and lesson ideas related to the SOFIA project. Find them at www.KidsTalkRadioUSA.com and www.OccupyMars.wordpress.com

 

 

 

Additional Information and Resources

Bob Barboza leads a team of scientists, engineers, and STEM & STEAM++ educators in building robots, Martian habitats, and simulated science and engineering labs for the Occupy Mars Learning Adventure’s Space Science Projects.   Their plan is to tour museums, science centers, departments of education and public schools with Occupy Mars exhibits, in tandem with Dawson’s Traveling Space Museum whenever possible.

www.KidsTalkRadioLA.com

www.OccupyMars.WordPress.com

http://www.KidsTalkRadioUSA.com

www.facebook.com/bobbarboza

https://www.youtube.com/user/KidsTalkRadio

For more information about SOFIA and Ms. Nichols’ Involvement, contact:

Nicholas A. Veronico, Public Affairs Officer

Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy

NASA Ames Research Center, MS-211-3

Moffett Field, CA 94035-1000

(650) 604-4589

###

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The Story of the Martian Greenhouse

A fire destroyed the greenhouse at the Mars Desert Research Station. Please help us rebuild!

Kids Talk Radio is going do what we can to help.

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The Story of Our Martian Greenhouse

In the late 1990s, Dr. Robert Zubrin and others organized a group of Earth-bound space enthusiasts with dreams of exploring the Red Planet and some engineering gusto to form the Mars Society, currently the world’s largest space advocacy group dedicated to the human exploration and settlement of Mars.

Several years later, the Mars Society established the Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS), which began operating as a Mars analog simulation outpost in the San Rafael Swell of south-central Utah. For over a decade, MDRS has hosted nearly 1,000 engineers, scientists, doctors, educators and university students from all over the globe to “practice for Mars.” Each year, crews of six live, work, and train at the facility for two-week field rotations running from October through May.

Food growth and plant science studies performed on site in the MDRS greenhouse (more commonly referred to as the GreenHab) meet a primary goal of the Mars simulation program – helping to determine the necessary food resources that future Mars explorers will require during a mission and long-term stay on the planet.

Two years ago, we revitalized this effort by overhauling the old GreenHab. The GreenHab team and dedicated GreenHab officers, made up of crew members from around the world, breathed new life into the humble Martian garden by upgrading the facility. A hydroponic vegetable system was installed to feed the crew fresh lettuce, space was cleared for carrot, pea and herb planters, and training resumed for numerous crew studies on how best to maintain life in extreme environments.

Firefighting on Mars
Well into the updated GreenHab’s second year, disaster struck the facility and the GreenHab caught fire. Quick action by the crew saved the structure from burning down completely and also spreading to the main MDRS habitat. Unfortunately, the GreenHab was severely damaged to such an extent that MDRS staff deemed it unfit for further use.

Fire at a leading international space simulation outpost makes the news, and a number of media outlets covered the incident, including Space.com, Slate, the Daily Mail (UK),and TechTimes. Although the fire dealt a serious blow to the MDRS program, staff and volunteers reacted quickly, as would future Mars pioneers. We built a temporary grow tent with discrete, low-power indoor gardens inspired by alternative gardening websites so that research could continue.

Our Improved GreenHab
Any future human settlement on the Red Planet would rebuild and grow from such a game-changing event, and the Mars Society is no exception. We aim to train and inspire future Mars pioneers to successfully overcome other-worldly emergencies.

So we’re rebuilding the GreenHab at MDRS. An all-new geodesic dome structure has been designed to house an improved assortment of food gardens and science experiments. This new greenhouse will be more efficient, easier to use, healthier for the plants and more suitable than ever before. Most importantly, it will be more technologically advanced, helping us better prepare for the coming space age and provide the needed research for humanity’s inevitable exploration and settlement of the planet Mars.

Mars Society staff and volunteers have already built a small sample geodesic test unit. We just finished a field trip to lay the building foundation, and we will return to MDRS in September to build the complete geodesic GreenHab structure in time for the upcoming 2015-16 field season, which begins October 24th. A generous donation immediately following the fire helped us reach this point. It covered the cost of the temporary grow tent, as well as materials to build the new GreenHab dome structure.

We Need Your Support
While the Mars Society has been able to raise part of the necessary funds to rebuild the GreenHab, a key component of the MDRS program, we still lack money to equip the new structure with the necessary tools to perform important crew research and experiments.

The Mars Society and MDRS staff are seeking YOUR HELP to restock and resupply the GreenHab. MDRS staff intend to build planters to study dirt and regolith, install a hydroponics system that can eventually be converted into aquaponics, and purchase LED lighting, fans, environmental controls, Rasberry Pis, sensors, and a whole list of other needed supplies and equipment.

The more you contribute, the better we can make the MDRS GreenHab and ensure its full conversion into a state-of-the-art Mars-focused research facility. Your involvement in this important campaign means that you are directly helping scientists and engineers to prepare for the human exploration and eventual settlement of the Red Planet.

Reaching the amount we are asking for – $10,000 – would be amazing. It alone would ensure a successful upcoming season. However, should Mars and space enthusiasts from around the world decide to support our MDRS GreenHab research program beyond the required amount, we have several stretch goals to make our GreenHab the solar system class habitat it deserves to be.

If $25,000 is raised, the Mars Society can outfit the planned greenhouse dome with completely automated environmental controls to handle the extreme temperature, humidity, light, water and carbon dioxide swings experienced in the Mars-like desert terrain of Utah.

If $50,000 is raised, the Mars Society can create two modular domes and expand the operational capacity of the planned domes to better simulate a real six-person Mars mission.

If $100,000 (or more) is raised, the Mars Society can construct one of its initial domes and use the remaining funds to contract with start-up aerospace designers to build a solar-powered inflatable habitat. This dream hi-tech structure would immediately become the world’s leading facility for aerospace agriculture testing, all thanks to your help.
The Mars Society is a  registered as 501(c)(3) nonprofit institution. Contributions to our campaign in the United States will be processed by FirstGiving and will be tax deductible.
Feel free to contact us for more information regarding perks which require Mars Society approval,

Dreaming of a Martian Colony
While there are many science-related crowdfunded projects for consideration online, the Mars Society’s “Veggies on ‘Mars’ – Help Rebuild the MDRS GreenHab” campaign is a unique project that will directly benefit planning for human exploration of the Red Planet.

In addition, getting involved with our campaign by making a contribution or publicizing this effort will help the Mars Society spread the adventure and excitement of space exploration to the world-wide public.

We need you to join our mission to rebuild the GreenHab. Please help us so the Mars Society can give back to the greater world community. Together we can make a wonderful MDRS GreenHab facility where we share how to “live off the land” of humanity’s eventual second home, a second Earth – the planet Mars.


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Matt Damon Discusses Playing NASA Astronaut Mark Watney in “The Martian”

Actor Matt Damon, who stars as NASA Astronaut Mark Watney in the film “The Martian,

Actor Matt Damon, who stars as NASA Astronaut Mark Watney in the film “The Martian,” participates in media interviews, Tuesday, Aug. 18, 2015, at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. NASA scientists and engineers served as technical consultants on the film. The movie portrays a realistic view of the climate and topography of Mars, based on NASA data, and some of the challenges NASA faces as we prepare for human exploration of the Red Planet in the 2030s. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

Actor Matt Damon, who stars as NASA Astronaut Mark Watney in the film “The Martian,

Actor Matt Damon, who stars as NASA Astronaut Mark Watney in the film “The Martian,” participates in media interviews, Tuesday, Aug. 18, 2015, at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. NASA scientists and engineers served as technical consultants on the film. The movie portrays a realistic view of the climate and topography of Mars, based on NASA data, and some of the challenges NASA faces as we prepare for human exploration of the Red Planet in the 2030s. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)


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Mars Movie News: The Martian

Project Manager for the Mars Exploration Rover mission at Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) John Callas, left, Author of “The Martian” Andy Weir, and NASA Astronaut Drew Feustel, participate in JPL employee panel discussion about NASA’s journey to Mars and the film, Tuesday, Aug. 18, 2015, at JPL in Pasadena, California. NASA scientists and engineers served as technical consultants on the film. The movie portrays a realistic view of the climate and topography of Mars, based on NASA data, and some of the challenges NASA faces as we prepare for human exploration of the Red Planet in the 2030s. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

Project Manager for the Mars Exploration Rover mission at Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) John Callas, left, Author of “The Martian” Andy Weir, and NASA Astronaut Drew Feustel, participate in JPL employee panel discussion about NASA’s journey to Mars and the film, Tuesday, Aug. 18, 2015, at JPL in Pasadena, California. NASA scientists and engineers served as technical consultants on the film. The movie portrays a realistic view of the climate and topography of Mars, based on NASA data, and some of the challenges NASA faces as we prepare for human exploration of the Red Planet in the 2030s. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

Project Manager for the Mars Exploration Rover mission at Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) John Callas, left, Author of “The Martian” Andy Weir, and NASA Astronaut Drew Feustel, participate in JPL employee panel discussion about NASA’s journey to Mars and the film, Tuesday, Aug. 18, 2015, at JPL in Pasadena, California. NASA scientists and engineers served as technical consultants on the film. The movie portrays a realistic view of the climate and topography of Mars, based on NASA data, and some of the challenges NASA faces as we prepare for human exploration of the Red Planet in the 2030s.

Bob Barboza received  an advance reader’s edition of the book “The Martin” about two years ago.  He was excited about the novel and predicted that it would be made into a move.  ” I ended up reading the book and listening to the audio CD’s.  I then called Andy Weir and we setup a Kids Talk Radio Science interview.   At that point I new that I was going to work some of this into the “Occupy Mars Learning Adventures.”, said Bob Barboza.  


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Europe OKs Funding for Mars Mission with Russia

exomars-2016-mission

Kids Talk Radio Space Science:  The race is on.  Who is going to get to Mars first?   How important is the STEM program in the USA and around the world at this point.  Just how important are the space programs?  What is the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter?   Students in the International Occupy Mars Learning Adventures Program are finding answers to these and other space science questions.   Can SPACE X come to the rescue?

Bob Barboza, Kids Talk Radio     http://www.KidsTalkRadioUSA.com

Europe OKs Funding for Mars Mission with Russia

Space News staff writer Dan Leone contributed to this article.

The ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter, along with an Entry, Descent and Landing Demonstrator Module (EDM), form the first mission in the European-led ExoMars program. The Orbiter and EDM are scheduled to arrive at Mars in 2016. This image shows the Orbiter and the EDM in cruise configuration.
Credit: ESA
View full size image

WASHINGTON — The ruling council of the European Space Agency (ESA) on March 15 agreed to continue funding a Mars telecommunications orbiter and atmospheric gas analyzer mission for launch in 2016, which along with an entry, descent and landing module will be launched on a Russian Proton rocket donated by the Russian space agency, an ESA official said March 15.

The council’s decision will permit the ExoMars industrial team led by Thales Alenia Space of France and Italy to proceed with work on the 2016 mission under a full development contract.

Industrial work up to now had been funded in a series of small tranches as ESA governments reviewed their options following NASA’s decision earlier this year to withdraw from the ExoMars project.

ExoMars is a two-mission project that is considered as a single program at ESA. The second mission, scheduled for launch in 2018, will carry an ESA-built Mars rover and a second entry, descent and landing module, this one built 80 percent by Russia and 20 percent by ESA, according to the ESA official.

As ESA managers had hoped, the arrival of the Russian space agency, Roscosmos, into the ExoMars partnership has saved the mission. NASA originally had agreed to provide Atlas 5 rockets for the 2016 and 2018 launches, and to divide with ESA the cost of the 2018 rover.

exomars-rover-prototype

ExoMars Rover Prototype
[Pin It] The photo shows the ExoMars Rover prototype demonstrated during the 2nd ExoMars Industry Day on 23 September 2010 in Turin, Italy. The purpose of the event was to provide a forum to discuss the progress of the ExoMars programme as well as to explore its programmatic and technological challenges.
Credit: Thales Alenia Space-Italy
View full size image
The ESA council has removed the immediate pressure on the program by agreeing to continue funding the 2016 mission. That funding was set to end by early April. The council nonetheless asked ESA Director-General Jean-Jacques Dordain to verify that it was not already too late to complete the ExoMars orbiter and the entry, descent and landing module and make the 2016 launch date. [Gallery: Inside Europe’s ExoMars Missions]

Thales Alenia Space officials have said they could make the 2016 deadline if there were no more stops and starts to the program’s funding. Dordain is expected to confirm this by early April, a decision that would permit ESA’s check-writing body, the Industrial Policy Committee, to continue the money flow to the industrial team.

An option to delay ExoMars by two years, with launches in 2018 and 2020, was scrapped as an unnecessary waste of money as it would maintain the industrial team in place for two additional years.

But while the council decision removes an immediate problem for ExoMars, it does not solve the longer-term funding issue that has dogged the project for years.

ESA governments have approved an ExoMars spending limit of 1 billion euros ($1.3 billion). But despite more than three years of effort, program managers have been unable to secure more than 850 million euros in formal commitments from ESA member states.

Meanwhile, NASA’s decision to pull out of the ExoMars campaign riled some of the agency’s congressional overseers. Rep. Frank Wolf (R-Va.), chairman of the House Appropriations commerce, justice, science subcommittee, in late February denied NASA’s request to take money Congress appropriated for ExoMars and use it instead to begin planning a new U.S.-led, $700 million-class Mars mission that would launch in 2018 or 2020. Wolf’s objection opens the possibility that work on several NASA-funded ExoMars instruments could remain funded through at least September.

But one U.S. scientist said Wolf’s maneuver would do nothing to get a U.S.-built instrument on the 2016 ExoMars mission.

“It’s too late for … Trace Gas Orbiter,” said Alfred McEwen, a professor of planetary geology at Arizona State University and principle investigator for the High Resolution Color Imager, one of four instruments NASA had planned to contribute to the 2016 orbiter. “ESA wants to have a high-resolution imager on their 2016 mission, but the hitch is they need a commitment from NASA. And even if NASA comes up with money to support us in 2012, that’s not enough for a 2016 launch. In spite of the House’s action which says ‘keep working on the Trace Gas Orbiter mission,’ it’s not possible to actually do so.”

With NASA out of the picture, ExoMars now becomes even more expensive as ESA will be responsible for 100 percent of the costs of the 2018 rover and 20 percent of the work on the Russian-led lander for 2018. [The Best (And Worst) Mars Landings]

Program officials had said these new charges could swell ESA’s total ExoMars obligations to around 1.2 billion euros.

In an interview, the ESA official agreed that new funds would need to be found. The most likely scenario, the official said, is that ESA’s 19 member governments will be asked to provide fresh support for the project when they meet in November in Italy.

That meeting’s agenda had already been stressed by the debt crisis that has gripped many governments in Europe, including Italy, which is the lead ESA contributor to ExoMars.

One official said that NASA’s 2010 decision not to co-develop a large space science mission with ESA had left a potential source of funds in ESA’s science budget. ESA science officials have said they may have to cancel that mission because without NASA it is too expensive.

The ESA official said that with ExoMars now taking on more scientific instruments, many provided by Russia, ExoMars backers may be able to persuade Europe’s space scientists to take part in the program. That would require the approval of the Science Program Committee, which decides Europe’s space science priorities within ESA’s budget.

The official said ESA is examining several possible funding sources, and had not ruled out a possible partial return of NASA to the 2018 portion of ExoMars, albeit in a relatively minor role.

Space News staff writer Dan Leone contributed to this article. This story was provided by Space News, dedicated to covering all aspects of the space industry.

The End……………………………………….


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The Occupy Mars Team is Working With Professor Jen Grey

Alien A 32 Jen Gray Collection

Our team needed new extraterrestrials for the ” Occupy Mars Learning Adventures Project.”   We are professor Jen Grey from California State University, Long Beach to help us.   She agreed to provide more of her aliens to our Andromeda Galaxy project.  “We created ten aliens on our own for the Milky Way Galaxy and found that we needed something different for the Andromeda Galaxy.”, said Bob Barboza.   Jen can will explain her work in a two part interview found at http://www.kidstalkradiousa.com/Kids_Talk_Radio_Podcasts/Kids_Talk_Radio_Podcasts.html.

Learn more about the Occupy Mars Project and Cybertouch Visitations.

Jen_8929


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New Space Science Movie: “The Martian”

The Martian is an upcoming science fiction film directed by Ridley Scott. The screenplay by Drew Goddard is based on the 2011 novel The Martian by Andy Weir. The U.S. production stars Matt Damon, with Jessica Chastain, Michael Peña, Kristen Wiig, Jeff Daniels, Kate Mara, and Donald Glover in supporting roles. It will mark Scott’s fourth science-fiction film after Alien (1979), Blade Runner (1982), and Prometheus (2012).

The film is scheduled to be released on October 2, 2015 in 3D and 2D.

Kids Talk Radio will cover the news related to the new movie “The Martian” by novelist Andy Weir.  I had an opportunity to interview Andy two years before the movie was finished.  I will be the first in line to see this movie.   I read the novel and listen to it on second time on audio tracks.  It inspired a lot of the work that we are doing on the “Occupy Mars Learning Adventures.”The language in the novel was not suitable for school age students.  I could not recommend the book for this reason. However, we translated the ideas into an exciting Jr. astronaut training program.

Bob Barboza

Bob Barboza