The Occupy Mars Learning Adventure

Training Jr. Astronauts, Scientists & Engineers


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Congratulations SpaceX

Congratulations to Elon Musk and the Entire SpaceX Team from Kids Talk Radio

SpaceX Dragon 1

They said it could not be done.  Elon Musk never gave up when things did not go his way.  When you fail twice in a row, people can loose the faith quickly.   What would have happened if Elon Musk had failed a third time?

The News is Coming in from around the world.  They did it. Mars Society Applauds SpaceX on Historic Rocket Landing    “Welcome back, baby!,” Musk said in a celebratory tweet.

SpaceX commentators described the launch and return – the first time an orbital rocket successfully achieved a controlled landing on Earth – as “incredibly exciting”.

“This was a first for us at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, and I can’t even begin to describe the joy the team feels right now having been a part of this historic first-stage rocket landing,” the top officer at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Brig Gen Wayne Monteith, said in a statement.

SpaceX is aiming to revolutionise the rocket industry, which up until now has lost millions of dollars in discarded machinery and valuable rocket parts after each launch.

Several earlier attempts to land the Falcon 9’s first stage on an ocean platform have failed.

The Mars Society, its staff and membership commend SpaceX, its founder, Elon Musk, and its team of scientists and engineers on the successful landing of the first stage of its Falcon 9 rocket at Cape Canaveral. SpaceX brought the rocket back to Earth for a soft touchdown, marking the first-ever rocket landing during an orbital launch. This major accomplishment proves launch vehicle re-usability, a pivotal event that will move humanity one step closer to exploring the solar system, and with it, the planet Mars.

“The SpaceX team had previously shown that they could develop new hardware in one-third the time at one-tenth the cost as the mainline aerospace companies. Now they have done something that the majors have never been able to do. And not just anything, but the single most important step towards inexpensive space launch – controlled recovery of the launch vehicle first stage. The competition had better wake up because they’ve just been ‘Sputniked’. Chapeau!,” said Mars Society President Dr. Robert Zubrin.

With this mission, SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket  delivered 11 satellites to low-Earth orbit for ORBCOMM, a leading global provider of Machine-to-Machine communication and Internet of Things solutions. The ORBCOMM mission had a five-minute launch window that opened at 8:29 pm ET on December 21, 2015 and will be launched from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. All went as planned, the 11 satellites  deployed approximately 20 minutes after liftoff, completing a 17-satellite, low Earth orbit constellation for ORBCOMM. This mission also marked SpaceX’s return-to-flight as well as its first attempt to land a first stage on land. The landing of the first stage is a secondary test objective.

Mars Society Applauds SpaceX on Historic Rocket Landing

The Mars Society, its staff and membership commend SpaceX, its founder, Elon Musk, and its team of scientists and engineers on the successful landing of the first stage of its Falcon 9 rocket at Cape Canaveral. SpaceX brought the rocket back to Earth for a soft touchdown, marking the first-ever rocket landing during an orbital launch. This major accomplishment proves launch vehicle re-usability, a pivotal event that will move humanity one step closer to exploring the solar system, and with it, the planet Mars.

“The SpaceX team had previously shown that they could develop new hardware in one-third the time at one-tenth the cost as the mainline aerospace companies. Now they have done something that the majors have never been able to do. And not just anything, but the single most important step towards inexpensive space launch – controlled recovery of the launch vehicle first stage. The competition had better wake up because they’ve just been ‘Sputniked’. Chapeau!,” said Mars Society President Dr. Robert Zubrin.


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Be an Astronaut: NASA Accepting Applications for Future Explores

Be an Astronaut: NASA Accepting Applications for Future Explorers

Kids Talk Radio Science is sponsoring a Jr. astronaut, engineer and scientist program for future astronauts. ( You can never start too early.)  Our program gets you started early.  This blog will provide more details each week.   We invite you to learn about NASA’s official astronaut application process.  This will make a good read for our students in grades five through twelve.  Send your student and parent questions and comments to Bob Barboza at: Suprschool@aol.com      http://www.KidsTalkRadioLA.com

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The Official NASA Communication:

Recently named the best place to work in the federal government for the fourth year in a row, NASA is looking for the best candidates to work in the best job on or off the planet. The Astronaut Candidate Application website now is live and accepting submissions through February 18, 2016

Qualifying U.S. citizens may apply at:

http://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/423817000

NASA astronaut Shannon Walker and astronaut selection manager Anne Roemer will answer questions about the job, and the application and selection processes, on Reddit.com beginning at 4 pm EST today. At that time, anyone may submit questions at:

http://www.reddit.com/r/IAmA/

The agency expects to announce final candidate selections in mid-2017. Those chosen may fly on any of four different U.S. spacecraft during their careers: the International Space Station, two commercial crew spacecraft currently in development by U.S. companies, and NASA’s Orion deep-space exploration vehicle.

“NASA is on an ambitious journey to Mars and we’re looking for talented men and women from diverse backgrounds and every walk of life to help get us there,” said NASA Administrator and former astronaut Charles Bolden. “Today, we opened the application process for our next class of astronauts, extraordinary Americans who will take the next giant leap in exploration. This group will launch to space from U.S. soil on American-made spacecraft and blaze the trail on our journey to the Red Planet.”

NASA astronauts will again launch to the International Space Station from Florida’s Space Coast on American-made commercial spacecraft — Boeing’s CST-100 Starliner and the SpaceX Crew Dragon. These spacecraft will allow NASA to add a seventh crew member to each station mission, effectively doubling the amount of time astronauts will be able to devote to research in space, expanding scientific knowledge and demonstrating new technologies.

Astronauts also will lift off again from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida aboard the Orion spacecraft, launched on the agency’s Space Launch System rocket, to unprecedented missions in lunar orbit. There, the space agency will learn more about conducting complex operations in a deep space environment before moving on to longer duration missions as it progresses on its journey to Mars.

To help accomplish this work, NASA will select qualified astronaut candidates from a diverse pool of U.S. citizens with a wide variety of backgrounds, including engineers, scientists and physicians. According to the professional networking site LinkedIn, some 3 million of the site’s members working in the United States appear to meet the minimum academic eligibility requirements for the job.

“NASA’s mission, and what we need from the astronauts helping to carry it out, has evolved over the years,” said Brian Kelly, director of Flight Operations at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. “Some people would be surprised to learn they might have what it takes. We want and need a diverse mix of individuals to ensure we have the best astronaut corps possible.”

Astronaut candidates must have a bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution in engineering, biological science, physical science, computer science or mathematics. An advanced degree is desirable. Candidates also must have at least three years of related, progressively responsible professional experience, or at least 1,000 hours of pilot-in-command time in jet aircraft. Astronaut candidates must pass the NASA long-duration astronaut physical.

“The Office of Personnel Management is proud to support NASA’s efforts to recruit our country’s next generation of astronauts,” said Beth Cobert, acting director of OPM. “One of this agency’s primary goals is to help attract, recruit, hire and retain the best and most talented workforce to serve the American people. We stand ready to help NASA find and support the talent it needs to fulfill its exciting mission to Mars. I’m proud to help agencies across government shape the federal workforce of the future by providing such tools as USAJOBS, our one-stop source for federal job and employment information.”

For more information about a career as an astronaut, and application requirements, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/astronauts


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I love this NOAA training program.

Explorer-in-Training Program

Some of our team members are studying the oceans of the world and the other half are part of the Occupy Mars Learning Adventures.  What training program do you want to do?

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The 2000 President’s Panel on Ocean Exploration Report, Discovering Earth’s Final Frontier: A U.S. Strategy for Ocean Exploration, calls for a national ocean exploration program to “train the next generation of ocean explorers.” One of the many ways the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research (OER) addresses this goal is through a partnership with the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) to provide early career explorers hands-on experience in ocean exploration on board NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer, “America’s Ship for Ocean Exploration”.

Apart from working with UCAR, NOAA OER has worked with academic, industry, and government institutions to create opportunities for students, faculty, and professionals to gain first-hand, at-sea and shore-based experiences with Okeanos Explorer expeditions. Partners include the NOAA Office of Education, NOAA Ernest F. Hollings Scholarship Program, NOAA Educational Partnership Program, Naval Sea Systems Command, Naval Undersea Warfare Center, the Five College Consortium, and regional NOAA Sea Grant offices.

Since 2009, UCAR and OER have hosted over 100 mapping explorers in training. For many, this first at-sea experience was invaluable in subsequent academic and career pursuits. OER continues to seek opportunities to work with external groups to train the next generation of explorers.

Interested to get involved with NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer field activities? Check out this page: http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/okeanos/getinvolved.html