The Occupy Mars Learning Adventure

Training Jr. Astronauts, Scientists & Engineers


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What robots should we bring to Mars?

ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCETUE, DEC 18, ’18
Robots and Millennials: Joining Forces To Change The Future of Work

 

Ironman isn’t Ironman without the suit, but the suit has no power without the man. That is the future of robotic development, people and robots, working together hand-in-hand to accomplish more than we ever thought would be possible.

Gartner predicts that by 2025 one in three jobs will be done by software, robots and smart machines, but that is not an ominous prediction. And in fact, Gartner predicts that by 2020, artificial intelligence will create more jobs than it eliminates.

The next generation of robots isn’t working to replace people, it’s working to improve the lives and jobs of people. We see that in the industrial world, where robot design is pivoting from giant mechanical arms that take up factory floors, to smaller, more collaborative bots, that are designed to work alongside people. While these collaborative bots only make up 3% of the market today, they will make up 34% of the market by 2025.

In today’s world, to suggest that automation will eliminate the need for human workers is proving to be as ridiculous as suggesting that tablets will replace laptops. With the United States enjoying a 3.8% unemployment rate, the job market is more booming, and employees can be more selective about the roles they want to take. Locked in the battle for top talent, companies are looking to find ways to get more efficient and effective, rather than cut headcount.

Deloitte recently published a study confirming this fact, in that the majority of organizations leveraging automation are focused on the benefit of increasing the efficiency and effectiveness of their workforce, rather than the motivation of replacing people. In most cases, as it becomes easier to accomplish formerly manual tasks through automation, organizations will take advantage of the extra bandwidth by retraining employees to manage more valuable or rewarding activities. And this suits the millennials just fine.

This post was originally published (Dec 12, 2018) on Forbes.com (https://www.forbes.com/sites/stevecarlin/2018/12/12/robots-and-millennials-joining-forces-to-change-the-future-of-work/#179382b67acd)

Steve Carlin

WRITTEN BY Steve Carlin

 

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What does the future look like?

ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCETUE, DEC 18, ’18
Robots and Millennials: Joining Forces To Change The Future of Work

 

Ironman isn’t Ironman without the suit, but the suit has no power without the man. That is the future of robotic development, people and robots, working together hand-in-hand to accomplish more than we ever thought would be possible.

Gartner predicts that by 2025 one in three jobs will be done by software, robots and smart machines, but that is not an ominous prediction. And in fact, Gartner predicts that by 2020, artificial intelligence will create more jobs than it eliminates.

The next generation of robots isn’t working to replace people, it’s working to improve the lives and jobs of people. We see that in the industrial world, where robot design is pivoting from giant mechanical arms that take up factory floors, to smaller, more collaborative bots, that are designed to work alongside people. While these collaborative bots only make up 3% of the market today, they will make up 34% of the market by 2025.

In today’s world, to suggest that automation will eliminate the need for human workers is proving to be as ridiculous as suggesting that tablets will replace laptops. With the United States enjoying a 3.8% unemployment rate, the job market is more booming, and employees can be more selective about the roles they want to take. Locked in the battle for top talent, companies are looking to find ways to get more efficient and effective, rather than cut headcount.

Deloitte recently published a study confirming this fact, in that the majority of organizations leveraging automation are focused on the benefit of increasing the efficiency and effectiveness of their workforce, rather than the motivation of replacing people. In most cases, as it becomes easier to accomplish formerly manual tasks through automation, organizations will take advantage of the extra bandwidth by retraining employees to manage more valuable or rewarding activities. And this suits the millennials just fine.

This post was originally published (Dec 12, 2018) on Forbes.com (https://www.forbes.com/sites/stevecarlin/2018/12/12/robots-and-millennials-joining-forces-to-change-the-future-of-work/#179382b67acd)

Steve Carlin

WRITTEN BY Steve Carlin

 


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Humans May Not Have to Carry Oxygen to Mars

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May 14, 2015

NASA is already in the planning stages for a future trip to Mars, and one of the hurdles they must jump is how humans will breath on the Red Planet. However, instead of carrying huge oxygen tanks, future human missions may actually utilize methods to actually produce the life giving gas on the planet itself.

NASA is interested in not just paying a visit to Mars, but is also looking at creating ecosystems that could support life for future missions to the planet. As part of this goal, it is funding the Indiana-based company Techshot, Inc. to research a solution that will produce oxygen that won’t rely heavily on the Earth for future Martian colonies.

“This is a possible way to support a human mission to Mars, producing oxygen without having to send heavy gas canisters,” chief scientist at Techshot, Eugene Boland says. “Let’s send microbes and let them do the heavy lifting for us,” he added.

The experiments by Techshot are carried out in its “Mars room.” This room simulates the atmospheric pressure, day and night temperature changes and solar radiation experienced on the surface of the Red Planet.

The atmosphere on Mars consists of 96% carbon dioxide and less than 0.2% oxygen (Earth has about 21% oxygen). If astronauts tried breathing the air on Mars, they would quickly suffocate.

Using Martian soil, the scientists test the feasibility of using ecosystem-building pioneer organisms to produce oxygen. At the same time, these organisms could also remove the nitrogen from the soil of Mars as well. Boland believes that habidable biodomes that “enclose ecopoiesis-provided oxygen through bacterial or algae-driven conversion systems” could exist on the Martian surface in the near future.

NASA has already states that its goal of landing astronauts on the surface of the Red Planet is vital to its mission to search for new life. That search, of course, has already begun. Recently, NASA’s Mars Curiosity rover found evidence of fixed nitrogen and carbon-containing organic molecules on the surface. These ingredients are key for life and the findings have sparked curiosity among scientists if there could be some form of life on Mars.

Scientists now believe that at one point in time Mars looked very different than it does today. It is now believed that ancient Mars once held waterways and even vast oceans in the northern hemisphere making it a good candidate for life, at least at one point in time. Whether there is still any life hidden away on Mars is a question that still must be answered and NASA hopes a manned mission will be the key to our search for life outside of Earth.

 


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Plastic Invades Earth. Don’t do this on Mars.

The Barboza Space Center looks at Santa Luzia Island as Mars on Earth.  We are getting ready to explore a variety of science experiment prototypes to simulate a journey to Mars.  Our team was sad to hear about the following news report.  We invite you to share your comments.  E-mail: Suprschool@aol.com.   Bob Barboza.

The island of Santa Luzia is a nature reserve, is uninhabited and is filled with plastic from various countries.

Santa Luzia invadida por plásticos de 25 países

Plastics from at least 25 countries have invaded the Cape Verdean island of Santa Luzia, the country’s only uninhabited and nature reserve, environmental associations warn, considering that garbage threatens several species on the island.

The alert was launched on the Facebook page of the Portuguese Society for the Study of Birds (SPEA), after two visits to the island under the project “Desertas – sustainable management of the Santa Luzia marine reserve”.

The environmental organization indicated that the first visit to the island of Santa Luzia took place in June, under the project, which is also coordinated by the Cape Verdean Environmental Association Biosphere I and the Cape Verde National Environment Directorate (DNA). a cleaning campaign on the beach.

SPEA reported in the same publication that the researchers returned to the island almost six months later and were “shocked” by the amount of plastic that had accumulated over the period.

According to the Portuguese environmental society, the island could be a paradise, but the plastics brought by the chains are turning it into a nightmare and a dump.

“We decided to go for an hour on the beach and try to find plastics with labels to know where all that garbage came from. To our surprise, there were already plastics from at least 25 different countries, “SPEA said in a publication accompanied by photos of the labels of their respective countries.

In the photos, there are labels from Portugal, Colombia, the Philippines, Uruguay, Ghana, Thailand, the United Kingdom, Malaysia, Uzbekistan, the United States, Japan, Greece, Morocco, Malaysia, France or South Africa.

The same Portuguese organization indicated that the beach of Santa Luzia is one of the most important for the reproduction of the big-headed turtle (caretta caretta), in which Cabo Verde has the third largest in the world, and that last year made more than five thousand nests on the island.

“During our walk, we found the parched corpses of two turtle-headed turtles who could not get to the sea because the path was lined with plastics. They died of hunger, thirst, and heat in a plastic car where they were trapped shortly after being born. These bags, nets, ropes, bottles, bottles are a deadly trap for wildlife, “warned Portuguese society.

Therefore, he appealed: “It is not enough to clean the beaches, we must prevent the plastics from going to the sea. Let’s turn this tide. “

The publication is also accompanied by a link from an online petition launched by BirdLife Europe and Central Asia to pressure the European Union to invest in ocean conservation.

The petition already has more than 19 thousand signatures and the goal is to reach 25 thousand.

Plastic and microplastics cause environmental and public health damage and according to the United Nations by 2050 there will be more plastic in the sea than fish.

Speaking to the Lusa news agency, the president of Biosphere Association I, Tommy Melo, lamented the scenario found in Santa Luzia and said that the organization he runs has been carrying out cleaning campaigns every year, but unfortunately the sea brings more garbage to the island .

“That’s why we have to campaign every year, because of the turtles, to reduce mortality, and protect other species,” said the biologist.

Santa Luzia, of the Barlavento group and located between São Vicente and São Nicolau, is the only uninhabited island of Cape Verde, classified as a natural reserve and used for scientific research, study visits, fishing and environmental tourism.

The Cape Verde Protected Areas page of the Ministry of Environment states that the island and adjacent islands (White and Shallow) “have a unique ecosystem with endemic biodiversity and the presence of world-class species that require protection.

Lusa

 


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Santa Luzia invaded by plastics from 25 countries​

The Barboza Space Center looks at Santa Luzia Island as Mars on Earth.  We are getting ready to explore a variety of science experiment prototypes to simulate a journey to Mars.  Our team was sad to hear about the following news report.  We invite you to share your comments.  E-mail: Suprschool@aol.com.   Bob Barboza.

The island of Santa Luzia is a nature reserve, is uninhabited and is filled with plastic from various countries.

Santa Luzia invadida por plásticos de 25 países

Plastics from at least 25 countries have invaded the Cape Verdean island of Santa Luzia, the country’s only uninhabited and nature reserve, environmental associations warn, considering that garbage threatens several species on the island.

The alert was launched on the Facebook page of the Portuguese Society for the Study of Birds (SPEA), after two visits to the island under the project “Desertas – sustainable management of the Santa Luzia marine reserve”.

The environmental organization indicated that the first visit to the island of Santa Luzia took place in June, under the project, which is also coordinated by the Cape Verdean Environmental Association Biosphere I and the Cape Verde National Environment Directorate (DNA). a cleaning campaign on the beach.

SPEA reported in the same publication that the researchers returned to the island almost six months later and were “shocked” by the amount of plastic that had accumulated over the period.

According to the Portuguese environmental society, the island could be a paradise, but the plastics brought by the chains are turning it into a nightmare and a dump.

“We decided to go for an hour on the beach and try to find plastics with labels to know where all that garbage came from. To our surprise, there were already plastics from at least 25 different countries, “SPEA said in a publication accompanied by photos of the labels of their respective countries.

In the photos, there are labels from Portugal, Colombia, the Philippines, Uruguay, Ghana, Thailand, the United Kingdom, Malaysia, Uzbekistan, the United States, Japan, Greece, Morocco, Malaysia, France or South Africa.

The same Portuguese organization indicated that the beach of Santa Luzia is one of the most important for the reproduction of the big-headed turtle (caretta caretta), in which Cabo Verde has the third largest in the world, and that last year made more than five thousand nests on the island.

“During our walk, we found the parched corpses of two turtle-headed turtles who could not get to the sea because the path was lined with plastics. They died of hunger, thirst, and heat in a plastic car where they were trapped shortly after being born. These bags, nets, ropes, bottles, bottles are a deadly trap for wildlife, “warned Portuguese society.

Therefore, he appealed: “It is not enough to clean the beaches, we must prevent the plastics from going to the sea. Let’s turn this tide. “

The publication is also accompanied by a link from an online petition launched by BirdLife Europe and Central Asia to pressure the European Union to invest in ocean conservation.

The petition already has more than 19 thousand signatures and the goal is to reach 25 thousand.

Plastic and microplastics cause environmental and public health damage and according to the United Nations by 2050 there will be more plastic in the sea than fish.

Speaking to the Lusa news agency, the president of Biosphere Association I, Tommy Melo, lamented the scenario found in Santa Luzia and said that the organization he runs has been carrying out cleaning campaigns every year, but unfortunately the sea brings more garbage to the island .

“That’s why we have to campaign every year, because of the turtles, to reduce mortality, and protect other species,” said the biologist.

Santa Luzia, of the Barlavento group and located between São Vicente and São Nicolau, is the only uninhabited island of Cape Verde, classified as a natural reserve and used for scientific research, study visits, fishing and environmental tourism.

The Cape Verde Protected Areas page of the Ministry of Environment states that the island and adjacent islands (White and Shallow) “have a unique ecosystem with endemic biodiversity and the presence of world-class species that require protection.

Lusa

 


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Who can help get humans to Mars?

Decorated Nasa astronaut Charles Bolden is impressed by the UAE's space programme. Chris Whiteoak / The National
Decorated Nasa astronaut Charles Bolden is impressed by the UAE’s space programme. Chris Whiteoak / The National

April 24, 1990. Space Shuttle Discovery blasts off from Kennedy Space Centre in Florida.

On board is the Hubble telescope, a project of vital significance that will broaden our understanding of space.

The pilot of the mission was Nasa astronaut Charles Bolden, on the second of his four space flights.

Nearly three decades on, Mr Bolden is still a man on a mission – with his latest trip being to the UAE, a country embarking on bold space adventures of its own.

Mr Bolden has come to the UAE as a space envoy. The initiative was organised by the US Embassy and during his brief stay, he will visit schools, talk to pupils and try to raise even more awareness about the importance of space travel as the UAE seeks to diversify from oil.

In a wide-ranging and exclusive interview with The National in Abu Dhabi, Mr Bolden shared his thoughts on the soaring ambition of the Emirates Mars Mission, why men are being left behind by women in the education stakes and how the Arab world needs to appreciate its historic achievements in science and mathematics.

Now 72, he speaks with an energy and enthusiasm that puts people half his age to shame.

Mr Bolden, also the first African-American Nasa chief and a decorated fighter pilot, turned first to the UAE’s efforts to place its Hope probe into orbit around the Red Planet by 2021.

He said if successful, the move will enhance the world’s understanding of the Martian atmosphere.

“You know how many nations have been successful in reaching Mars? Not very many,” he said. “It is a huge deal for us to have the Emirates Mars Mission reach Mars.”

_______________

Read more:

UAE space programme: all you need to know

UAE space chiefs confident Russian rocket will carry the first Emirati astronaut to space despite launch failure

Emirati astronomer collaborates with NYUAD on black holes research

_______________

There are currently two orbiters around the planet. Nasa studies the upper atmosphere with one, while India looks at the lower with another.

Hope will look at the middle atmosphere and will complete the picture,” he said. “We could not do that alone.”

The UAE space programme is advancing on several fronts. Along with the Mars mission, the UAE’s first astronaut is scheduled to blast into orbit on a Russian Soyuz rocket next April, while Khalifa Sat, the first-ever Emirati-designed satellite, will be launched into space from Japan on October 29.

“This is their third satellite,” said Mr Bolden. “How many nations of this size can say they’ve launched three satellites?”

He thinks so highly of the Emirati programme he agreed to serve as adviser to the director general of the UAE Agency.

“In terms of performance, it is among the best young space agencies in the world,” he said.

Human endeavour in space requires many characteristics. Chief among them is courage in the face of adversity – something Mr Bolden knows plenty about. He grew up in segregated South Carolina when the prospect of becoming a fighter pilot, let alone an astronaut would have seemed remote. But he went on to fly 100 missions for the US Navy during the Vietnam War.

Sheikh Mohammed bin Zayed, Crown Prince of Abu Dhabi and Deputy Supreme Commander of the Armed Forces greets Charles Bolden, administrator of the Nasa, at the Ramadan Majlis on Monday. Mohamed Al Hammadi / Crown Prince Court – Abu Dhabi
Charles Bolden meets Sheikh Mohammed bin Zayed at a Ramadan Majlis in 2016. Mohamed Al Hammadi / Crown Prince Court – Abu Dhabi

Reflecting on that divisive conflict, Mr Bolden said he values his wartime experience, but feels people still have not learned the harsh lessons of the past.

“War is not a way to solve problems – war is a lousy way to solve problems. But as bad as it may have been, it demonstrated what can be done when a nation is focused on achieving great things,” he said.

“We went to the moon when we were fighting each other in the streets.”

By 1981, Mr Bolden had made it through the arduous selection process to join the astronaut corps and went on to pilot or command four space flights on the now retired Shuttle programme.

He can still recall picking out the lights of Abu Dhabi and Dubai from space.

“They are like Paris and you can see the structure of towns because where there is good fortune and money, it is very well lit,” he said.

“Seeing the planet from space changes your perspective on the planet. When you see how small and insignificant people are, if Martians came to Earth they might turn around.”

When Mr Bolden was Nasa chief, one of his aims was to improve relations with the Muslim world and highlight the pioneering and historic role played by Arabs in mathematics, science and engineering.

“Appreciation has to start here,” he said.

But he sounds a note of caution for young men, who he warns are being left behind by ambitious women.

“They are hungry.” he said. “They have had to fight to get where they are today. I hope one of the things my visit will do, in addition to keep pushing women to succeed, is to help young boys understand they need to get educated.”

Mr Bolden’s final space flight was in 1994, when he commanded Space Shuttle Discovery. This carried the first Russian cosmonaut to fly on a Space Shuttle. International and commercial collaboration, which the UAE has embraced, is what he predicts will separate successful missions from failures.

“Emiratis should feel proud – you are helping humanity to become more knowledgeable,” he said.

 


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Cash for Designing A Mars Colony

 

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The Mars Colony Project

Bob Barboza is the founder/director of the Barboza Space Center and the International Kids Talk Radio Science News network in Long Beach, California.  He is working with USA and international high school students to design, build, prototype and exhibit robots, satellites, mobile science labs, rockets and Martian habitats.  He is a member of the Mars Society and he presidents regularly at their annual conventions.  He is forming and training international high school space science “Tiger Teams” in project-based learning.  His projects integrate STEAM++ (science, technology, engineering, visual and performing arts, mathematics, computer languages and foreign languages.  His project is called the “Occupy Mars Learning Adventure.”  We are willing to add our scientists, engineers, educators and citizen scientists to help international high school students to Design the First Human Settlement on Mars.

Questions: Bob.Barboza@gmai.com

 

Mars Settlement Design Contest

Design the First Human Settlement on Mars
Sign up for the Mars Society’s Mars Colony Prize
 
The Mars Society is holding a special contest called The Mars Colony Prizefor designing the best plan for a Mars colony of 1000 people. There will be a prize of $10,000 for first place, $5,000 for second and $2500 for third. In addition, the best 20 papers will be published in a book – “Mars Colonies: Plans for Settling the Red Planet.”
 
The Mars colony should be self-supporting to the maximum extent possible – i.e. relying on a minimum mass of imports from Earth. In order to make all the things that people need on Earth takes a lot more than 1000 people, so you will need to augment both the amount and diversity of available labor power through the use of robots and artificial intelligence. You will need to be able to both produce essential bulk materials like food, fabrics, steel, glass, and plastics on Mars, and fabricate them into useful structures, so 3-D printing and other advanced fabrication technologies will be essential. The goal is to have the colony be able to produce all the food, clothing, shelter, power, common consumer products, vehicles, and machines for 1000 people, with only the minimum number of key components, such as advanced electronics needing to be imported from Earth
 
As noted, imports will always be necessary, so you will need to think of useful exports – of either material or intellectual products that the colony could produce and transport or transit back to Earth to pay for them. In the future, it can be expected that the cost of shipping goods from Earth to Mars will be $500/kg and the cost of shipping goods from Mars to Earth will be $200/kg . Under these assumptions, your job is to design an economy, cost it out, and show that after a certain initial investment in time and money, that it can become successful.
 
In scoring colony designs, points will be allocated on the following basis:
 
+ 40 points technical design: What systems will be used? How will they work?
+ 30 points economic: How can the colony be made economically successful?
+ 10 points social/cultural: What should Martian society be like? What kinds of schools, arts, sports, and other activities, should there be? How, given a fresh start, can life on Mars be made better than life on Earth?
+ 10 points political/organizational: How should the colony govern itself?
+ 10 points aesthetic: How can the colony be made beautiful?

The contest is open to all people from every country. You can work alone or as part of a team. Each contestant will need to submit a report of no more than 20 pages presenting their plan by no later than March 31, 2019. A downselect will then be made to the top 10 plans, whose authors will be invited to present them in person in front of a panel of judges chosen by the Mars Society at the International Mars Society Convention in southern California in September 2019.
 
Entrants should file their design plan reports using the Design Submission Formlocated on the Mars Colony Prize website. During submission of their design, entrants will also provide confirmation that they are granting the Mars Society non-exclusive rights to publish their reports and agreeing to accept the decision of the judges as final. Reports should be in PDF form and use 12 point Times typestyle, 1” margins.
 
To help expose you to some ideas you might want to consider, a number of papers, including preliminary plans for Mars colonies and their necessary subsystems, are available on the MarsPapers.org research paper archive by selecting “Human Settlement” or “Utilizing Mars Resources” in the Search >> Category dropdown box.
 
Here is an additional useful reference for Mars Colony contestants. For any questions, please contact: info@marssociety.org.